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Carer, Cervix, Anaesthetics

Anaesthetics and Cancer of the Cervix.

Anaesthesia(G) may be required for diagnostic procedures such as hysteroscopyThis is an examination suing a small telescope to have a look inside the uterus.

The procedure is often performed in hospital under a short general anaesthetic, but with modern small flexible cystoscopes, it can be done as an outpatient procedure, on in a doctor’s surgery under a local anaesthetic.

">(G), D and C(G), EU, and/or laparoscopy(G) as well as definitive treatment including brachytherapyThis is a form of internal radiation therapy provided by a radioactive source.

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or hysterectomy(G). In addition, some procedures such as LLETZAn abbreviation that stands for large loop excision of the transformation zone.

It is used to remove the transformation zone when taking a biopsy of the cervix if it looks abnormal.

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and laser cone biopsyThe use of a laser light in preference to a scalpel to perform a cone biopsy.

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are occasionally performed under a local anaestheticThe injection of a drug into a small area of the body to make it feel numb.

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with or without conscious sedationThe administration of one or more drugs to make a patient feel drowsy, relaxed and happy.

Often known as 'twilight sleep'. In this state sensations which might otherwise be unpleasant become less significant.

A patient frequently remembers nothing about the procedure afterwards

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.

Anaesthesia for Gynaecological Cancer - Information for Carers

What carers need to know about Anaesthetics.

Many people are frightened of an anaesthetic as it involves loss of control and entry into a dark and scary place (i.e. unconsciousness). During the preoperative visit the Anaesthetist will evaluate the patient for any medical conditions and how they might influence the anaesthetic.

They will also try to allay the patient's fears by explaining what is about to happen.

Gynaecological Cancer - Anaesthetics

What is Anaesthetics?

Anaesthetics is a medical specialty concerned with the provision of anaesthesia(G), pain relief and perioperative medicine.

The anaesthetist's function is to make you insensitive to pain during surgery, to supervise your recovery from anaesthesia, and to ensure you are comfortable afterwards. Many drugs and techniques may be used including general anaesthesia(G), regional anaesthesia(G) local anaesthesiaThe injection of a drug into a small area of the body to make it feel numb.

">(G) and conscious sedationThe administration of one or more drugs to make a patient feel drowsy, relaxed and happy.

Often known as 'twilight sleep'. In this state sensations which might otherwise be unpleasant become less significant.

A patient frequently remembers nothing about the procedure afterwards

">(G)
together with monitoring techniques appropriate to your general medical condition and the magnitude of the surgery.

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